4 Tiny RPGs Good for a One-shot

There are a lot of RPGs out there that contain a lot of words and rules and stuff.  I know that a good system of rules and setting info can really structure a game and give you something to sink your teeth into, but it can sometimes be freeing to get rid of everything but the bare essentials; the DM, the players, and the premise. This is especially true when you just want a quick game at short notice, or a one shot.

Because this games don’t have a lot of structure to work around and build on, they could potentially be a bit difficult for an inexperienced DM to run, especially if they aren’t fairly confident with their improvisation skills. However, with the right DM I think these games can show off the silly fun that can be had with an RPG in a far more easy to digest way for newer players. Rather than giving someone the impression that RPGs are all about numbers, loot, and killing things, these games show off the side of RPGs that are about teamwork, inventive problem solving, and just having fun by telling stories with friends!  Continue reading “4 Tiny RPGs Good for a One-shot”

Verdun: A WW1 Game Done Right

If you’ve read my previous review of Battlefield 1 then you’ll know what I thought of its attempt of a World War 1 setting. At best it was just a lazy reskin of existing Battlefield mechanics and gameplay, and at worst it was an insult to the reality of the war. Well now allow me to introduce you to a game that is also a multiplayer first person shooter, and yet manages to combine historical authenticity and solid gameplay into something unique and enjoyable.

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Verdun was developed and self-published by two very small development teams based in The Netherlands. It was released as a beta on Steam early access in 2013 and fully released in 2015. The game consists entirely of online multiplayer matches based around one core gametype called ‘Frontlines’, alongside very simple deathmatch, team deathmatch, and wave defense modes. The game boasts a large amount of authentically modelled and functioning WW1 weapons, accurate uniforms and squads for various countries, and maps based on real WW1 battles, mostly consisting of areas around Verdun itself, but also some others based in other areas and later parts of the war.

Now obviously this game is going to be compared to Battlefield 1. There are only a handful of games set in WW1 out there, and as far as I know, these are the only two that are FPS games. So why do I say this game is so much better than Battlefield? Well let’s take it through a few different criteria. Continue reading “Verdun: A WW1 Game Done Right”

Men of War: a brilliant RTS despite its problems

I’ve been a huge fan of real-time strategy (RTS) games since Age of Empires. Unfortunately the RTS genre has been lacking anything decent or interesting for quite a while now, if you exclude Total War. There is however this fairly unknown series of games called Men of War, which I highly suggest you check out if you want an interesting and unique RTS to try… with some issues.

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Continue reading “Men of War: a brilliant RTS despite its problems”

Goat Lands : Spiders on the Storm | A 5th Ed D&D Adventure Module Review

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Before reading any further I need to make one thing perfectly clear.
This is not a tabletop RPG where you play as goats. I know, I was disappointed too.

On cracking open the colourful PDF I instead discovered a Dungeons and Dragons 5th Edition adventure module by Fainting Goat Games set in their uniquely crafted Goatlands realm. Given that this is a module I will not be reviewing the entirety of D&D 5e but instead focusing on what this little package of adventure brings to your table

Spiders on the Storm is designed for a single sessions gaming to challenge a group of level 1 players and crank them up to second level- perfect for starting out a new campaign, yes, but also introduces a fresh new setting for long time players. The Goatlands are a piece of a collaborative world of which little is known but the developers express their passion for fleshing it out more and more with every addition. All of the core rules from your typical 5e campaign remain true here but with some flavourful additions; New Gods, locations and powers are just a taste of what the mini-book offers. Continue reading “Goat Lands : Spiders on the Storm | A 5th Ed D&D Adventure Module Review”

Skum Of The Stars: an RPG Review

For our next post in our RPG month I bring you a review of an interesting little Sci-Fi RPG called Skum of the Stars recently published by Owlman Press.

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The rulebook starts off with a page of background on the universe you’ll be playing in, and as with most things about this game things are kept quite simple yet effective. A huge and ancient inter-stellar empire, awesomely named The Blood Empire, has gone the way of Rome and collapsed, allowing barbarians and criminals to run rampant across the galaxy. This has led to new opportunities of adventure, not for your usual RPG heroes, but instead for pirates, warlords, thieves and other outlaws. The writing in this section really conjures up images of something like Star Wars, except each space-port is as much of a wretched hive of scum and villainy as Mos Eisley. Other than this there is mention of new kingdoms and empires popping up and vanishing regularly, an increasing scarcity of warp-gate technology causing chaos, and the existence of many different humanoid species. As I said, things are kept quite simple in terms of story here, which can be a nice change for a DM hoping to run a wacky Sci-Fi game without having to read a ton of fluff to just get started coming up with their own campaign. There’s just enough here to kick you off and give you the tone of the game. Continue reading “Skum Of The Stars: an RPG Review”

Shadow of Mordor – Surprisingly Good Lore

I recently got around to playing Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor, a game that came out in 2014. What I found there pleasantly surprised me, as the story touches on some of the lore in an interesting way while also doing its own completely non-canon thing.

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As far as the game itself goes, it is a pretty decent one. It is very similar to the Assassin’s Creed games in terms of combat and movement, except thankfully the enemies don’t just wait their turn to be countered, but can end up swarming you instead. You also end up with some very powerful abilities to deal with the huge amount of orcs you may have to kill. The most interesting thing about the gameplay is the interaction with the enemies themselves. A large part of the game is focused on ‘Sauron’s Army’, and in the menu you can see the composition of the enemy captains and warchiefs. The first thing you’ll notice about the enemies is that they will be directly influenced by you in a few ways. One such way is that if one kills you they may gain a promotion, and then if they see you again they’ll react, usually with annoyance, at having to kill you again. You can also manipulate the enemies into fighting among themselves, or even dominate a lesser captain, and help him rise through the ranks. This element of the game becomes the main point of the story half way through, but I’ll leave it there for now.

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The combat in this game is slightly brutal…

The main thing I wanted to mention was the way in which the game uses Middle Earth history in its story, as well as where and when it is set. The story starts off with the main character, a Gondorian ranger named Talion, at the Black Gate of Mordor. Straight away this made me question the game a little because I’m pretty sure Gondor wasn’t able to have rangers stationed there at this point. Also the place is immediately overrun by orcs, or uruks as Talion points out. This is apparently meant to be the moment that Sauron has returned to Mordor to build his army. This also doesn’t exactly fit, as I’m pretty sure there wouldn’t be such a sudden event, but rather a slow establishing of power until  Sauron reveals unveils his presence in Third Age 2951. I’ll allow the game a couple of small liberties like these however, and at least we now know roughly when the game is set; before the War of the Ring.  Continue reading “Shadow of Mordor – Surprisingly Good Lore”

Probando Juegos para Dos en Board in the City (Southampton)

Este lunes Adie y yo nos pasamos parte de la tarde en un café de juegos de mesa en la ciudad de Southampton (Reino Unido), llamada Board in the City. Ya lo conocíamos de otra escapadilla que hicimos este verano, cuando estuvimos jugando con un grupo de amigos a cosas múltiples. El sitio es muy acogedor: antes era un pub de vecindario, hay muchas mesas, muchos juegos, el personal es súper friki (de hecho, nos pasamos como media hora antes de ponernos a jugar hablando de superhéroes y warhammer con uno de los empleados), y lo mejor de todo es que transmite una sensación muy hogareña. Y los batidos están riquísimos 😉

Total, ya que esta vez solo éramos nosotros dos, decidimos aprovechar la situación y probar juegos que fuesen solo para 2 o con buena jugabilidad con el numero mínimo de jugadores. Cogimos Seven Wonders Duel, pero como los dos ya estábamos familiarizados con la dinámica del juego tras haberlo probado en grupo, nos inclinamos por otras cajas. Como tampoco teníamos todo el tiempo del mundo a nuestra disposición nos decidimos por dos juegos con duración máxima de una hora cada uno. Así que aquí vengo a dejaros esta breve reseña y comentario:

Continue reading “Probando Juegos para Dos en Board in the City (Southampton)”