Total War: WARHAMMER – Out With The Old World

If you have played Total War: Warhammer but haven’t kept up with it for a while, then there is a lot of new content that has been added to it in the last few months. With the fast approaching release of the second installment in the Warhammer series, one which will be compatible with the first game in a few ways, they’ve been bringing the current game up to date with some new changes and additions. 

The last time I wrote about TW:W they had just released the Wood Elves faction, which was their last fully new race pack added to the game, but that isn’t to say that what they’ve added since has been lacking in comparison, far from it. So what may you have missed since then? what have they brought in to see out the Old World in preparation for their introduction to the New World?

Fleshed Out Factions

Since the game came out there have always been a few factions that seemed very placeholder. The most obvious example of this was Bretonnia, which only featured a very small roster of units that you could only play in custom battles but were unplayable in campaign. Another faction that was even more meagre was Norsca, which was essentially a poor copy of Chaos, as it just used their basic starting units. Well in February this year they released a big free update to Bretonnia, and just this month they released a full Norsca as a pre-order bonus for buying the second game that can be added to the first game right now. 

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Continue reading “Total War: WARHAMMER – Out With The Old World”

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Modding Skyrim in 2017

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim has been around for almost 6 years at this point, which in terms of videogames, is relatively old. Despite this there are still tons of mods for the game being constantly made and released on the Nexus and Steam Workshop. There are over 53,000 mods for Skyrim on the Nexus, and there are probably even more from other sources and different mods you can find for the Special Edition of the game (although less overall). So if you’re new to mods, or haven’t modded Skyrim for a few years, how are you supposed to find the good ones with so many out there? Well I’ll do my best here to give you a rundown of some of the best new mods as of 2017.

Instead of going through every small mod that adds a new object to the game or a tiny tweak to the gameplay systems, here I’m going to focus on the mods that I think add a lot to the game. There are a fair few of these now, which is probably thanks to the fact that modders have gotten so familiar and proficient at modding the game we are seeing far more substantial mods than before, when they were much rarer in the past.

Overhauls

There have been a lot of ‘overhauls’ for Skyrim over the years. These are mods that significantly change and rework the gameplay systems. Most of these involve changing the perk trees or spell lists in some way. Some of the older ones to check out include Skyrim Redone, and Perkus Maximus which mainly change the perk trees and add more interesting and specific perks. Duel – Combat Realism makes combat a lot tougher with more varied and clever enemy behaviour. and Midas Magic Evolved which adds a lot of new spells.

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As for newer mods, there have been some fairly interesting ones. First there is Path of Sorcery – Magic Perk Overhaul which as you can imagine, makes changes to the magic perks of the game. Instead of with something like Midas Magic and other spell mods, this one doesn’t just dump a ton of spells into the game, but works on the core principles of the vanilla magic system, but expands on it greatly, allowing you to specialize more, or simply become more powerful and varied in your magical abilities. Continue reading “Modding Skyrim in 2017”

My Top 5 WWII Games

We may be seeing a bit of a comeback in WW2 videogames soon, what with the new Call of Duty going back to its roots, perhaps influenced by Battlefield’s decision to aim in a similar direction with their WW1 setting. So if you fancy trying out some of the best WW2 games that are currently available, then allow me to share with you my favourites!

1. Red Orchestra 2: Heroes of Stalingrad

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Now with these lists I generally don’t intend to rank the games in any particular order, and the same goes here, with the little exception of this game. Red Orchestra 2 is perhaps my favourite WW2 game and First Person Shooter of all time. Despite being released in 2011 and reasonably old now, it still holds up. The gameplay has such a good mix between realism and enjoyability. The graphical and sound design are brilliant, with some of the best modeled weapons, and best weapon sounds I’ve ever seen. Even the voice acting is top notch, with the team you’re playing as speaking accented English that somehow doesn’t sound cheesy, and the enemies speaking either Russian or German. The combination of the fast yet thoughtful and deadly gameplay, the necessity of team cohesion from squad to commander level, and realism where it counts is a brilliant combination.  Continue reading “My Top 5 WWII Games”

How to make your own Pokémon game!

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Right off the bat, this was a tutorial I wish existed back when I was eight. Or eighteen. I’m almost twenty-eight and I’m still pretty hype to see it. Today we’re going to plough through how to make your own Pokémon title in the most convenient way possible!

Some of the gamer-savvy folk out there might remember a lot of hype last year surrounding a fan-game called Pokémon Uranium said to contain all new monsters, regions and storylines. People got pretty pumped for its eventual release after NINE years in development! And once it hit the web it took less than an week for Nintendo to send the Mushroom Kingdom’s legal department to shut it down. Of course, once it’s on the internet, it’s always on the internet…

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So what exactly was Uranium if it wasn’t an official Nintendo release? Continue reading “How to make your own Pokémon game!”

Geek Etymology – Mana

Today I bring you the next post of Geek Etymology! If you missed my first steps into the past of our favourite geeky terminology then take a look here!

This time I will be tackling the mysterious origins of the word that we give to the power source of wizards and spellcasters, the very essence of magic: Mana! It’s in our name so I thought it was the obvious next choice. Unlike with the Paladin last time, there is far less actual etymology to follow with the evolution of the word, so I won’t be going down much of a rabbit hole this time. The origins of this word are however still rather interesting and maybe unexpected.

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Power Creep – Why MMOs, MOBAs and TCGs Die Early

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If you’re ever stepped away from your favourite competitive or collectable game for a while, only to be demolished by the new expansion content when you return, then you’ve felt the sting of power creep. Or maybe you were always bad at the game? But for today we’re going to assume it was power creep.

So what are we talking about when we use these dreaded words? For many the term has simply become a way of accusing developers for not keeping an eye on game balance, frequently seen between Massively Multiplayer Online games (and more recently, the MOBA epidemic) and more traditional card games. Is it really just every new axe that’s better than your old axe? Is it every card in a block that uses that broken new mechanic? Actually before it became a catch-all term the phenomena of Power Creep warned of a very specific problem that occurred usually over years of development on a particular game. The idea that as time goes on the ‘power curve’ that carefully maps out the value of something with its power will skew higher and higher, making low-cost tools even stronger and completely negating the more balanced content that came before. Continue reading “Power Creep – Why MMOs, MOBAs and TCGs Die Early”

My Top 5 Videogame Soundtracks

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I’ve been listening to a lot of my favourite videogame soundtracks lately, and it got me to thinking about why the music from games can be so great in ways that other mediums can’t accomplish. The music in a game is a very important part of the whole experience. It can give a certain desired feel or encourage different emotions at certain times. Also, when listening back to these tracks they can bring back memories of great moments you had when playing, even years later.

So here I’ve decided to go through my top 5 soundtracks. It was a struggle to get it down to this many, but in the end my criteria for including them on this list meant that I wanted games that I loved to play the most as well as having amazing music. Also, there needed to be more than just a memorable main theme. Game series’ such as The Elder Scrolls or Battlefield have legendary main themes, but the rest of their music is ,while perfect for their games, mostly forgettable. So some of my honorable mentions include various titles such as FTl: Faster Than Light, Frozen Synapse, and Killing Floor. While I both love these games and their soundtracks, they were simply overshadowed by those on this list and would probably feature in a top 10. There are also a couple of games such as Payday: The Heist and Payday 2, as well as Hotline Miami that I really enjoy the soundtracks for, but I simply haven’t played much if at all, and I mostly like their music more than the actual game.

Anyway without further ado, here is my top 5 in no particular order! Continue reading “My Top 5 Videogame Soundtracks”