Making a Fantasy Map

When you’re making an RPG or building a fantasy world the map is a very important part. It helps you visualize what you’ve created, and if it is for a game, then it helps players feel immersed in your world. So when Lilly told me she was making her own world along with and RPG system, I was very interested in having a crack at making a map for it.

Now I’m not very experienced in making maps, but I have given it a go on smaller scales before, so here I’m going to go through how i went from a basic sketch on paper to the (mostly) finished map for the land of Dardenia, with plenty of trial and error along the way.

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So how did I get from Lilly’s first sketch, to this?

Continue reading “Making a Fantasy Map”

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‘ARTHUR LIVES!’ New FATE RPG Book Interview with Jason Tondro

Manaburnt talks with lead designer Jason Tondro from Fainting Goat Games about their new FATE RPG book (releasing next week) ‘Arthur Lives’! A game about swords, sorcery and… punk rock?

In Arthur Lives! characters take on the role of a reincarnated court of King Arthur brought into the modern urban world. The twist? The olde heroes have been reborn into multiple new lives- at the same time! Will your Arthur prove his heroic destiny? Or will the pretenders take your spotlight?

Arthur lives is built on the FATE tabletop system and is driven by decisions and storytelling putting a fascinating new spin on the everyday world. The project is currently in its last week on Kickstarter and you can find it here:

And if tabletop RPG’s are your jam and you’re into playing FATE, Icons, Mutants & Masterminds, D&D and more… check out Fainting Goat Games catalogue over on the DriveThru for all your tabletop needs!

http://www.drivethrurpg.com/browse/pub/3915/Fainting-Goat-Games

The Path to Making a Youtube Gaming Channel

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The Path to Making a Youtube Gaming Channel

So you’ve probably noticed over the last 10 years or so there’s been a considerable rise in gaming related videos on the internet, most of them orbiting the Google megamachine ‘Youtube’. As we approach 2020 more ‘tubers’ are also reaching out to Twitch and console-ready streaming, but there’s still an avid fanbase that always comes back for more bitesize videogame goodness.

But why might you be drawn to this hobby? The potential promise of money and fame? A passionate love for a certain game you can’t put down? Or maybe, like me, you just have old favourites you wish to share. Well if you’re considering taking that vital first step- namely putting a video on the web and letting fate decide- there are a few important things you should know… !

Welcome to the hard path to making a Youtube gaming channel!

Continue reading “The Path to Making a Youtube Gaming Channel”

Geek Economy – The Board Game Cafe Experience: Draughts & Board-in-the-City

Hello and welcome to one of them updates where we discuss how being a geek affects our domestic economy. Today I am going to discuss with you guys my personal experience from two board-game cafes that have opened in the last couple of years in the UK and that I have now frequented enough times to have a formed opinion on the subject. These are Draughts (London), and Board-in-the-City (Southampton). First of all though, let me give you the background to what have been the parameters I have used to make up my opinion. As a board-gamer I have been brought up and developed in a space that was friendly and cosy: home. Mum and Dad always happy to give you a run for your money at any game we own. So, for me, cracking some board games and having fun is not just about being sociable with my friends, but also about being comfortable whilst having a good time. Some of you may relate to this: having being bullied for years for being “weird” and liking games, comfortable is important. What other things have influenced my thoughts? Well, the games, of course. This is again something I have inherited with my genes I suppose: back at home, my parents have cartloads of games. From the classical Cathedral which I fondly remember playing as a child in the 90s with my dad, to the most recent releases in the market – I would say it is thousands but that is an exaggeration. You get the just nonetheless. With such an extensive collection, you cannot help but develop the following characteristics: you care for your games (particularly when you have friends coming over), and a healthy diversity of length, themes, number of players, dynamics and formats. And now, on to the practical stuff. Gamers of the world, you sure must agree with me, when you are playing you require the following: space and food. Why? Because board games take up space, and you may be playing something as sweet and simple as Story Cubes, then the next thing you know, you are halfway through an X-Wing party. Therefore, you need a decent sized surface to be able to get around and spread yourselves. But also, you need food – snacks and a drink mostly, and these take up space too. When we have games nights, we usually order lunch/dinner as well, and for sure you cannot have always space for the game and your meal at the same time – plus what kind of heathen wants pizza grease on their tiles?! Sure you stop for a sec, right…?. I am more concerned about the snacking factor in any case. You know: we want crisps, little nibbles to share, that sort of stuff you can yell at your best friend with your mouth full for closing your own train track whilst in the middle of a Ticket to Ride; that sorta thing. These are, in my opinion, indispensable. So, let’s see how this battle comes across.

Continue reading “Geek Economy – The Board Game Cafe Experience: Draughts & Board-in-the-City”

Verdun: A WW1 Game Done Right

If you’ve read my previous review of Battlefield 1 then you’ll know what I thought of its attempt of a World War 1 setting. At best it was just a lazy reskin of existing Battlefield mechanics and gameplay, and at worst it was an insult to the reality of the war. Well now allow me to introduce you to a game that is also a multiplayer first person shooter, and yet manages to combine historical authenticity and solid gameplay into something unique and enjoyable.

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Verdun was developed and self-published by two very small development teams based in The Netherlands. It was released as a beta on Steam early access in 2013 and fully released in 2015. The game consists entirely of online multiplayer matches based around one core gametype called ‘Frontlines’, alongside very simple deathmatch, team deathmatch, and wave defense modes. The game boasts a large amount of authentically modelled and functioning WW1 weapons, accurate uniforms and squads for various countries, and maps based on real WW1 battles, mostly consisting of areas around Verdun itself, but also some others based in other areas and later parts of the war.

Now obviously this game is going to be compared to Battlefield 1. There are only a handful of games set in WW1 out there, and as far as I know, these are the only two that are FPS games. So why do I say this game is so much better than Battlefield? Well let’s take it through a few different criteria. Continue reading “Verdun: A WW1 Game Done Right”

Geek Obsession #7 – The Goth Dolls Collection

Today I bring you something quite dear to me, perhaps one of my earliest collections ever: my Goth dolls. These came from two brands: the Bleeding Edge Goths (also known as BeGoths), and the Living Dead Dolls. And this all started in a very unexpected way.

My first trip to the UK took place when I was 9. My parents obviously took me sightseeing everywhere possible, and one of the days we ended up down Oxford Street and towards Canary Wharf. Back in the day there used to be a branch of Forbidden Planet near there – an outlet if I remember well! Mum and dad had visited it frequently when they used to live in London, so they took me there to see what they had as we didn’t really have that sort of thing in my home town – this was no ordinary comic store. And there she was: red-headed, goth looking Lillian (With 2 ‘L’ like me!). It was a sign. I took it home with me and, well I guess the rest just started flocking a little later.

I started with the 12″ dolls, then I acquired I few of the 7″ models, and finally perhaps my favourite and most precious item ever…I do appreciate the pics could be better, however, these boxes are bloody difficult to photograph without reflections, because the thing is…These gals have never come out of the box! (And never will as far as I am concerned…).

So this is Lillian on the left. She was part of the first original series (1), that only had 5 models and are as of the early 2000s sold out. Believe it or not, I am confident in a moment of my life or two, I’ve probably looked like that…barr the piercing. Of series 1 I do also own Victoria – my good friend Remi brought that all the way from the USA for my birthday one summer he was out there learning English! It was epic! (However, Victorias box is probably the worst of them all so trying to get a decent pic of her is pretty hard, poor thing!). The one on the right is Lolita Sun. She was an exclusive edition launched between series 1 and 2…She is pretty special.

Continue reading “Geek Obsession #7 – The Goth Dolls Collection”

Badaptations – Why Anime and Videogame movies don’t work

If you’ve been a geek as long as I have you’ve seen your fair share of Badaptations. Hell if you’ve been a geek this past year alone you’re probably sick of them!

It’s no secret that as much as we love series, films and videogames that fit outside the norm of mainstream cinema the transition to the silver screen has always been a rough one. Some of the lauded worst-ever films have been attempts of shoving a popular franchise into a two hour box and calling it a Hollywood release. But is it really so hard to get it right? Are there really so many hurdles between source and screen? Well I welcome you to a brief tour of the absolute chaotic maelstrom of getting ANYTHING right in big screen adaptations. Grab your favourite comic and clutch your Nintendo DS because this is going to hurt.

Let’s start big: Why culture isn’t as cultured as we’d like to think.
The impact of cultural difference may not seem to be a challenging adaptation hurdle outside of the obvious points (like language, locations, common phrases) however there are many possibly alienating differences in your common anime and videogames. Consider for a moment that almost all anime (and most videogames) share a cultural fingerprint with Japan- a country where academic intelligence is lionised, eating at a noodle tent is like stopping by Starbucks and every entertainment label worth their salt is churning out teenage starlets by the dozen. It may not stand out in every moment of action but there are plenty of quirks in the daily life of the Land of the rising sun that outside audiences would find unconventional, and are often removed during the adaptation process… or replaced, as was the case with Pokémon swapping the term Rice Ball with ‘Jelly Donuts’.

After all, compared to major American cinema how many films do you see each year that take place entirely in a high school?

Then there are Theological differences- a lot of ideas tend to stem from the subtle cultural touches that come from a society’s deep routed religious history. We tend to be blind to it, about how even the simplest parts of how we see the world are moulded by it; what should and shouldn’t be illegal, the dividing line between sentient and non-sentient objects, our value against the greater universe. Even issues that evolve over time like the justification of prejudice against others. In entertainment these usually come across in the major themes, like someone’s personal struggle or the formation of the world around them. Movies like AKIRA, Spirited Away, Ghost in the Shell and countless more deeply reflect the theological differences that are more prominent in the east, thus making them much more difficult to translate to an audience that doesn’t relate to them. While the transhumanist philosophies in Ghost in the Shell could still be followed by anyone willing to put thought into their movie experience the more niche messages of reincarnation and the organic spirit may be lost. Cultural and theological differences form the greatest obstacle when it comes to making an adaptation of any property from a foreign country- and unfortunately the Hollywood studio system has a putrid record of translating these ideas.

To address the real elephant in the room I would like to call into question the ‘unspoken problem’ with the movie making mentality of Hollywood and the greater system, however that would be untrue. Audiences and critics around the world have been chastising the Hollywood studios for years now about their inherently flawed means of putting stories and adaptations to the silver screen however it has yet to see any results. It would be more accurate to call it a ‘frequently spoken problem’.
That problem being the curse of studio intervention and attempting to fit all properties through what I can only describe as the Hollywood Bottleneck. With dozens, if not hundreds, of critical eyes on a production from its inception and storyboarding right the way through to post-editing it’s no surprise that the amount of meddling can sink a project before its even reached completion. While we’ve seen countless instances of this in our chosen sample group, such as the more recent Assassins Creed movie being heavily cut for ‘simplicity’ and the Ghost in the Shell movie being entirely re-written from its source, adaptations from foreign sources are not the only victims. The most recent attempt at bringing the Fantastic Four superhero troupe to the big screen fell victim to so much studio dissection that its director Josh Trank released a statement about the film being a failure and not “his story” even before the movie premiered.
An unfortunate truth of seeing well-established stories from other mediums pushed through the ringer of Hollywood is that every step of production will see cuts and changes made for localisation, meeting the standards of the general audience, marketability, hitting the broadest possible age demographic, appeasing interests groups etc.
And while I would love to round off the point here and lay the entirety of the blame on the studio system I sadly cannot, though I will place MOST of it on them.

Let’s not forget the hand of the creator is a powerful thing. The person who forges a story or product will do so through their own lens and much of that creator will be seen in the work- this is an art philosophy that has existed for thousands of years. As such we can understand why there are dangers in passing the work of one individual into the care of another for adaptation, but this is not inherently a bad thing. A new set of hands can make changes that put new perspective on the work or allow a different generation to appreciate its message. An example being the translation of book to theatre; such as Gaston Leroux’s ‘Phantom of the Opera’ being passed to Andrew Lloyd Webber for the stage play. However one must be very careful that the artist the work is passed to be appropriate and understands the source material- not something we can say has often happened in nerdy adaptations. In fact some have been downright disasters.

As a case study let’s look at M. Night Shyamalan and his Avatar-less ‘Last Airbender’ movie. While there is no small task in crafting a three-season long show into a few clean cut movies it was not the inclusion of content, or even the changing of details, that destroyed this franchise and left them dead at just one movie out of the proposed three. It was that Shyamalan did not respect the style and voice of the original material and attempted to impose a style on top of it. Anyone familiar with the director’s works can immediately spot the tropes he employs: the colourless environment, the long sequences of slow, heavy sounding dialogue, a reliance on exposition instead of establishing shots or character action. These devices- frequently employed in his other works- starkly contrast the story he’s attempting to adapt and it shows in every single scene. This is a true example of the artist’s voice conflicting with the voice of the original work, something we’ve seen often in similar projects… Rocky Morton and the Super Mario Brothers, James Wong and Dragonball… And anything Uwe Boll touches. Ugh.

This leaves us with the double-edged sword. The curse of production that many would perceive as a great strength and is often used to berate the movie making culture for being unable to turn simple, low-cost source material into a ‘big budget’ worldwide release. The fact of the matter is that movies are a substantial investment of money as well as talent, but that financing is not simply for prettying up the existing material they work with. Everything in film carries a substantial cost, from the crew and actors to the visual and sound design to the intensive editing and promotional side. As a result we often see tens if not hundreds of millions spent on otherwise unimpressive products.

For example the applauded anime movie Dragonball Z Resurrection F cost a respectable 5 million dollars to produce and making ten times that in profit. By comparison the American production Dragonball Evolution film cost a whopping (though cheap by Hollywood standard) 45 million to create. That’s a considerable distance between the two and the simple fact that one is animated and the other live-action has a lot to do with that. We must remember that animation and digital animation are inherently cheaper than all the components that go into a live-action remake, not to mention the gross disregard for spending that goes into a production of this size.
Similarly the Ghost in the Shell (2017) movie cost 110 million but turned only 20 million in sales domestically, barely 50 more than that worldwide. Proof that with such elevated production costs the inevitable drop when a product fails is much, much more devastating. This also applies in the world of video games, which in their native medium are already more expensive to create that animated films or series. Assassin Creed (2007) cost 26 million to create on console and the movie adaptation a decade later cost more than 100 million above even that!

Is this weight of absurd money-spewing something we simply have to live with in film-making? Actually no, one of the highest grossing films of the last few decades was Paranormal Activity which had a price tag of approximately… 11,000. Barely even breaking five digits. But turned a mind blowing 200 million in profits around the world after audiences everywhere requested their movie theatres begin showings all across America and then in Europe.
The moral lesson to learn here is that the greatest profits come from good movies, regardless of how much they are budgeted. The same will be true of the best adaptations from geek culture once it begins to sink in that multi-million dollar botched projects are not the only way to bring an idea to a western audience. Though there is much speculation at this time the Netflix ‘Death Note’ movie is set to air soon and may be able to set a precedent that lower cost endeavours are actually the more profitable means of ‘westernising’ anime, but only time will tell.

Videogames and anime to this day suffer a taboo in the movie-centric western world. This sceptical eye of the public has thankfully been loosening over the past two decades, with videogames now becoming hot property in the world of media sales (though the actual products themselves are still shown very little regard) and despite anime never finding a mainstream hook it has achieved a loyal fanbase in the western audience- enough so to generate large scale conventions of its own.
While these mediums are not universally beloved in the east, with Japan and Korea being major players, they are not stigmatised for their medium or inherent design- with locations such as Akihabra Tokyo even celebrating them as a major source of tourism.
This same dismissal was only recently shared by the comic book industry here in the west, but with the rise of Marvel and the oversaturation of comicbook movies we’ve seen how vastly this has changed. But why are comic books the exception to this terrible curse while anime and games retain their stigma?

The simple answer is; they aren’t. Comics are not an exception; they have simply been present in the popular consciousness long enough and with enough exposure that we have adopted it into the mainstream. This is partly why the explosive success seems so universal in geek culture here, because it’s one of the few elements of nerd-centric entertainment that has appealed to such a wide fanbase and with constant new content from major studios. That isn’t to say it was an overnight success story- many people applaud comic movies as a running success but this simply isn’t true, there were dozens of missteps and failures leading to this point, with films like Batman and Robin (1997), The Fantastic Four (2005), The Hulk (2003) and Captain America (1990) to name just a few!

One argument often overlooked is the success of the loosely inspired adaptations. These are movies which take the original material as a jumping off point but create something new from them, like the surprisingly great 2014 film Edge of Tomorrow which was based on the light manga ‘All you need is Kill’. Similarly the original Matrix film pledges its inspiration to anime movies like AKIRA and Ghost in the Shell while still forming its own story and narrative, just with similar themes and tropes.
While this method is difficult to pull off and does require a talented writer familiar with the sources it may prove the most effective means of bridging the cultural gap.
But what happens when these kind of changes are made on a property that’s attempting, at least by appearances, to emulate its source material? This is a frequent cause of controversy in adaptations that make alterations to elements people believe to be crucial to the source. Often seen in cases of relocating a story to a different country or entire time period, or the dreaded ‘white-washing’ effect.

We’re in an unfortunate time where controversy can be called on even when the adaptation doesn’t overstep itself- simply because a rough history has conditioned us to be especially critical.
Even though the 2017 movie was terrible it should be recognised that Major Mokoto from Ghost in the Shell (the lead heroine) is SUPPOSED to be modelled after an American woman, and a model no less. So all the claims of whitewashing here are actually more knee-jerk reaction than actual outrage. Many sites have reported this ‘race-bending’ (as appears to be the new term) is a major contributor to the movies downfall, but is it really? Granted many examples of re-casting inappropriate actors has wounded similar attempts, like the appalling ethnicity twisting in Last Airbender which saw the Inuit main cast becoming white and the notably pale Japanese antagonists becoming dark skinned Indian and Arabic… even stranger to note Shyamalan as the director is an Indian man himself.

Before I’m bombarded with pitchforks and flaming love-pillows allow me to draw attention to an important factor; even in their native countries adaptations of games and anime are often BAD. Anyone seeking proof need look no further than the 2015 Attack on Titan movie, which flopped with audiences and critics despite the show being at the height of popularity. Similar issues can be seen with the upcoming Full Metal Alchemist movie which many predict will slump into a similar trap as previous pop-anime films. On the other hand there has also been a history of successes with highly-praised movies like Oldboy and Battle Royale seeing large renown internationally despite being based on a manga, with most people completely unaware of their origins. Also the incredibly popular Death Note live-action movies spawning multiple sequels and spin offs that have reached a worldwide audience.

With our collective minds aching from all these different problems its clear to see why we’ve hit so many stumbling points in our pursuit of perfect adaptations. The source material is rarely fitting of a cinematic runtime, we’re stacking writers and directors on works they have no connection to, the Hollywood studio system is poisonous even at the best of times and most importantly we’re attempting to adapt material that has a fundamentally different philosophy than most of the audiences its being re-directed to. Does this swarm of flies in the ointment mean we’ll never see a golden age of nerd cinema?

If comic books are anything to go by what we’re actually seeing is the growing pains of new genres. The failures that will eventually be recognised for what they did wrong not only as a means of critique but also a means of learning. It may take some time before we see our first breakthrough- our Batman Begins or our Ironman- but once that success comes we’ll see every studio holding rights to major anime and videogame properties doing everything in their power to imitate it. We have to remember that, even though our beloved franchises are outside the norm, if something makes money then everyone wants a piece of it. If cinema is a corrupt game of follow-the-money then we’ll leave a trail of silver dollars.

Also; If they dare mess up AKIRA with a badaptation we will riot.